Discount Cheap Microsoft Project Professional 2016 Software


Powerful in the right hands. Detailed options for managing resources. Customizable reports. Cons Confusing to buy, learn, and use. Doesn't integrate with many apps outside the Microsoft family. Pricier than competitors. Bottom Line It takes specific conditions for Microsoft Project to be a team's best option for project management, but when all the stars align, it's a powerful tool.

First, you really must have a certified project manager on board to drive the software. Second, time has to be on your side and your certified project manager can't be rushed to learn to use the tool. Third, your team should already be a Microsoft house, or it should be willing to become one. Fourth, the number of projects your team manages and their level of complexity should be quite high.

If your organization meets these criteria, Microsoft Project may prove to be an invaluable tool. If not, you're better served by another option, and there are many. If you've read this far and realized that Microsoft Project isn't right for your team, I recommend three other options. Both are reasonably priced and very easy to learn to use, even if you're not a project management master yet. The other tool that earns the Editors' Choice is LiquidPlanner, a high-end tool that's ideal for larger teams managing not just projects but also people and other resources.

A Few Caveats Microsoft Project takes a long time to learn to use and even longer to master. I am writing this review from the point of view of someone who has not mastered it not even close but who has experimented with it for some weeks and asked questions of Microsoft representatives to learn more.

My point of view includes comparison testing with dozens of other project management apps, from lightweight ones designed for small businesses to enterprise-grade options. Because Microsoft Project is something of a bear, I would recommend complementing my article with user reviews by people who have worked with the tool extensively and can provide different insights into how it holds up in the long term.

Pricing and Plans There are two ways to buy Microsoft Project. You can add it to an Office subscription or you can buy a standalone version for on-premises deployment. The options get confusing, so let me go through them piece by piece. View All 11 Photos in Gallery Office add-on. When you add Microsoft Project to an Office subscription, you get the cloud-based version of the app.

There are three pricing levels for this type of purchase: Project Online Professional, Premium, and Essentials. With this level of service, each person gets to use the Microsoft Project desktop app on up to five computers for project management only, not portfolio management. Even though it's a desktop app, it still runs in the cloud i.

Access via web browsers is also included. It offers everything in the Professional account, plus portfolio management tools. It comes with advanced analytics and resource management features that you don't get in the Professional account. The third level, Essentials, is not a tier of service so much as a role type you can choose for team members who have fairly limited responsibilities in the app. You have to have a Professional or Premium membership first to utilize the Essential option.

Essential users can only access Microsoft Project via a web browser or mobile device. They can only update task statuses, work with timesheets, share documents, and communicate with colleagues.

They don't get desktop apps or other functionality. Standalone on-premises deployment. If you don't want to use the cloud-hosted version of Microsoft Project, you can host it locally, and there are three options for how to do it.

With this version, you get one piece of software installed locally on one computer, and only one person can use it. It's old-school software in the sense that it doesn't have any collaboration features. You get project management tools, but nothing for resource management. Each license is good for only one computer. It has everything in Project Standard, plus the ability to collaborate via Skype for Business, resource-management tools, timesheets, and the option to sync with Project Online and Project Server.

Project Server, the last option, is a version of Microsoft Project that enterprises can get with SharePoint I could go into detail about how to get SharePoint and the three tiers of enterprise service for Office involved, but I'll assume that if this option is of interest to you, you already have a support person at Microsoft you can ask for more information.

TeamGantt is a good place to start for comparison. It's a web-based tool that includes collaboration and is much easier to learn to use than Project. LiquidPlanner's most popular plan, Professional, is better for medium to large businesses. Like Microsoft Project, LiquidPlanner takes time to master in part because it offers so many tools for both project management and resources management.

Getting Started I can't stress enough the fact that Microsoft Project is meant to be used by experienced, or more precisely trained, project managers. It's not designed for learning on the fly. It doesn't come with clear tutorials for getting started.

It assumes familiarity with both big concepts and fine details of project management. If you're thinking you might use this software but you or the lead person who will be using the app don't know what a burndown report is, I would seriously advise you to consider a different tool.

The app itself looks a lot like Excel. It has the same familiar tabbed ribbon interface seen in other Microsoft Office apps. The spreadsheet portion of the app holds all the data related to tasks or resources. To the right of the cells is a Gantt chart reflecting the schedule as you build it. Microsoft Project supports all the typical things you'd want to do in a project management app.

For every task, you can enter a lot of detail, such as a description, notes, start date, task duration, and so forth. Recurring events are supported, as are dependencies, custom fields, and baselines for tracking actual progress versus planned progress. The bars in the Gantt chart are interactive, so as you adjust them, the information in the cells updates as well. When a task is in progress, you can indicate the percent that it's done by sliding a smaller line inside its associated spanner bar toward the right.

In addition to having a Gantt chart view, Microsoft Project offers calendar and diagram views as well. The calendar view is self-explanatory, while the diagram view is similar to the Gantt view, only it contains additional details about the task. If you follow a timeline better when there's some sense of a narrative behind it, the diagram view could be useful.

As mentioned, the first time you use the app, there isn't much coaching on how to get started. Some apps provide interactive on-screen tutorials. Others start you out in a sample project. Still others point you early to a channel of help videos for getting started. Microsoft Project has none of that. In fact, the little that Project does provide may merely add to your confusion, such as this little nugget of information that I saw on day one: Project Online is an entirely separate service that offers full portfolio and project management tools on the web.

It includes Project Web App, and can, depending on your subscription, also include Project Online Desktop Client, which is a subscription version of Project Professional.

Features and Details Microsoft Project is powerful when it comes to the more detailed aspects of project management, such as resource management, reports, and timesheets. Powerful doesn't mean easy or simple, of course.

In Microsoft Project, with the tiers of service that include resource management, you can manage work which includes both generic people and specific people, as well as other "work" related resources , materials, and costs. You can do a lot with these elements if you have the time and the inclination. For example, you can add detail to materials resources, such as a unit of measure, and if you want to get really detailed, you can enter costs for materials.

What if the costs of a material changes over time? In Microsoft Project, an additional detail panel allows you to track and account for changes in cost over time. With work resources, I mentioned you can track specific people or generalized people. Depending on the work you're tracking, you may need to assign general human resources, such as a "front-end programmer" or "QA tester," rather than a specific person.

It all depends on what you're managing and how. Reports are highly customizable, although, like the rest of the app, it takes time to learn how to use them. Some of the more rudimentary features are neat and surprisingly simple to use, however. You can generate a report by navigating to the report section and selecting what data you want to appear in different modules on the page.

Using a field selection box on the right, you can make the topmost element the project, and below it you might add a table showing how much of each phase of the project is already complete, and so forth.

All the elements you add to the report are stylized, and they don't automatically adjust to accommodate one another. For example, if text from one element runs long, it can crash into another. Other minor visual elements often need finessing, too. You can end up wasting a lot of time resizing boxes and nudging elements left and right to make it look decent, which probably isn't what you're getting paid to do.

That's a designer's job, really. That said, styling the reports in this way has a purpose. Once you finish with all the adjustments, the final product looks ready to export to a presentation directly in PowerPoint, no doubt , so you can go from generating reports to sharing them without many additional steps.

Within the timesheets section, for those versions of the app that include it, you can have team members fill out weekly time sheets for whatever duration you need, such as weekly or monthly. Team members can report not only time spent on tasks related to projects, but they can also indicate what time of work it was, such as research and development or fulfillment.

Another option lets people add time to their time sheets for tasks aren't specifically related to a project.

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Microsoft Project Professional 2016 Product Key

Stay organized, focused, and in charge. Tackle anything from small projects to large initiatives. You may or may not be a project manager, but now you can be the boss of any project with a powerful, easy-to-use app. Easy to start, simple to use, and vice versa Work confidently with a powerful project management tool that makes getting started and managing projects both simple and easy. Take the pain out of painstaking projects Even complex projects are easier to manage when you can choose methods and tools that best suit your needs.

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